Final Programme

We’re very much looking forward to welcoming all of our speakers and participants to the conference in a few days.

Here is the final version of the programme.

 

7 July 2016

9.15: WELCOME

 

9.30-11.00: PANEL 1

Verse Miscellanies and Authorship

Chair: Abigail Williams

Adam Bridgen (University of Oxford), ‘The death of the author: wills in verse’

John T. Gilmore (University of Warwick), ‘Authorship and anonymity in eighteenth-century British Latin verse’

Carly Watson (University of Oxford), ‘How many authors make a miscellany? Authorship in printed verse miscellanies of the eighteenth century’

 

11.15 -12.45: PANEL 2

Science and Religion in Eighteenth-Century Poetry 

Chair: Kelsey Rubin-Detlev

James Morland (King’s College London), ‘Connections with ancient atheism: Lucretius as an adaptive eighteenth-century poetic influence’

Andrea Penso (Stendhal-Grenoble 3 University), ‘The connection between poetry and philosophy in Italy during the second half of the eighteenth century’

Joanna Raisbeck (University of Oxford), ‘Naturphilosophie and eschatological perfectibility: poetry and literature between philosophy, religion, and natural science in Karoline von Günderrode’

 

12.45-1.45: LUNCH

 

1.45-2.45: PANEL 3

Poetry, Music, and Sound

Chair: Carly Watson

Christopher Chan (University of Pennsylvania), ‘“Harmoniously confus’d”: Visual fantasies and audible anxieties in Alexander Pope’s Windsor-Forest

Martin Wåhlberg (Norwegian University of Science and Technology), ‘Poetry and music: the song connection’

 

3.15-4.45: PANEL 4

Approaches to André Chénier 

Chair: Cédric Ploix

Maria Klimova (Radboud University Nijmegen), ‘Translating Hellenism: The poetic techniques of André Chénier’

David McCallam (University of Sheffield), ‘The Orpheus effect: André Chénier and “embodied” poetry’

Susan Reynolds (British Library), ‘“We are all the contrary: The changing image of Greece in eighteenth-century European poetry’

 

5.00-6.30: KEYNOTE LECTURE

Catriona Seth (University of Oxford), ‘Melancholy marks: Gray’s Elegy and French verse’

 

6.30: DRINKS RECEPTION

 

7.30: CONFERENCE DINNER

 

8 July 2016

10.15-11.15: PANEL 5

Poetry and the Epistolary

Chair: Joanna Raisbeck

Grace Egan, ‘The “measure” of Burns’ letters and songs’

Kelsey Rubin-Detlev (University of Oxford), ‘Poetry and friendship in the letters of N. M. Karamzin to I. I. Dmitriev’

 

11.45-12.45: PANEL 6

Poetry and Sociability

Chair: Jennifer Batt

Stephanie Clayton (Cardiff University), ‘“Consign[ing] Eusebia to celestial Fame”: Integrating patronage and authorship in the poetry of Frances Thynne Seymour, the Countess of Hertford’

Kathleen Keown (University of Oxford), ‘“Call it not Poetry, Call it Rhyming”: Reconsidering eighteenth-century women’s occasional poetry’

 

12.45-1.30: LUNCH

 

1.30-3.00: PANEL 7

Cultures of Consumption

Chair: Adam Rounce

Julian Ferraro (University of Liverpool), ‘Satire, laughter, and appetite in the poetry of Pope and Swift’

Andrew Kahn (University of Oxford), ‘Poetry and the discovery of literary pleasure in eighteenth-century Russia’

Andrew Lincoln (Queen Mary, University of London), ‘Imperial landscape: A poet on Gibraltar’

 

3.15-4.45: PANEL 8

Disseminating Knowledge

Chair: Octavia Cox

Marianne Brooker (Birkbeck, University of London), ‘“[T]he sensation, without the sense, of connection”: Methodizing the compendium’

Corrina Readioff (University of Liverpool), ‘A poetic battle: epigraphic rivalry in The Tatler and The Female Tatler

Madelaine Schurch (University of York), ‘“The world’s something bigger”: Anna Barbauld and the poetics of astronomy’

 

5.00-5.30: PRESENTATION

The Launch of the Redeveloped Digital Miscellanies Index

 

5.30-6.30: KEYNOTE DISCUSSION

Digital Humanities and Eighteenth-Century Poetry

Jennifer Batt (University of Bristol) and Adam Rounce (University of Nottingham)

Updated Programme

Registration for the conference extended!

The registration fee is £20, or £15 for students / unwaged; lunch and refreshments will be provided on both days of the conference.  Find out more and register on our secure booking site by Friday, 1 July 2016.

There have been a few changes to the programme since it was first posted. Scroll down for an updated version.

 

7 July 2016

9.15: WELCOME

 

9.30-11.00: PANEL 1

Verse Miscellanies and Authorship

Chair: Abigail Williams

Adam Bridgen (University of Oxford), ‘The death of the author: wills in verse’

John T. Gilmore (University of Warwick), ‘Authorship and anonymity in eighteenth-century British Latin verse’

Carly Watson (University of Oxford), ‘How many authors make a miscellany? Authorship in printed verse miscellanies of the eighteenth century’

 

11.15 -12.45: PANEL 2

Science and Religion in Eighteenth-Century Poetry

Chair: Kelsey Rubin-Detlev

James Morland (King’s College London), ‘Connections with ancient atheism: Lucretius as an adaptive eighteenth-century poetic influence’

Andrea Penso (Stendhal-Grenoble 3 University), ‘The connection between poetry and philosophy in Italy during the second half of the eighteenth century’

Joanna Raisbeck (University of Oxford), ‘Naturphilosophie and eschatological perfectibility: poetry and literature between philosophy, religion, and natural science in Karoline von Günderrode’

 

12.45-1.30: LUNCH

 

1.30-3.00: PANEL 3

Poetry, Music, and Sound

Chair: Carly Watson

Christopher Chan (University of Pennsylvania), ‘“Harmoniously confus’d”: Visual fantasies and audible anxieties in Alexander Pope’s Windsor-Forest

Joan Passey (University of Bristol), ‘“The Shakespeare of prose”: Ann Radcliffe and the sonics of sonnets’

Martin Wåhlberg (Norwegian University of Science and Technology), ‘Poetry and music: the song connection’

 

3.15-4.45: PANEL 4

Approaches to André Chénier

Chair: Cédric Ploix

Maria Klimova (Radboud University Nijmegen), ‘Translating Hellenism: The poetic techniques of André Chénier’

David McCallam (University of Sheffield), ‘The Orpheus effect: André Chénier and “embodied” poetry’

Susan Reynolds (British Library), ‘“We are all the contrary: The changing image of Greece in eighteenth-century European poetry’

 

5.00-6.30: KEYNOTE LECTURE

Catriona Seth (University of Oxford), ‘Melancholy marks: Gray’s Elegy and French verse’

 

6.30: DRINKS RECEPTION

 

7.30: CONFERENCE DINNER

 

8 July 2016

9.30-11.00: PANEL 5

Poetry and the Epistolary

Chair: Joanna Raisbeck

Nicholas Cronk (University of Oxford), ‘“Family verses” in Voltaire’s correspondence’

Tobias Heinrich (University of Oxford), ‘Loquacious shepherds: Poetic dialogue in German Anacreontics’

Kelsey Rubin-Detlev (University of Oxford), ‘Poetry and friendship in the letters of N. M. Karamzin to I. I. Dmitriev’

 

11.15-12.45: PANEL 6

Poetry and Sociability

Chair: Jennifer Batt

Mary Chadwick (University of Huddersfield), ‘Antigua, Boston, Denbigh: miscellaneous manuscript poetry and idealised femininity in the eighteenth century’

Stephanie Clayton (Cardiff University), ‘“Consign[ing] Eusebia to celestial Fame”: Integrating patronage and authorship in the poetry of Frances Thynne Seymour, the Countess of Hertford’

Kathleen Keown (University of Oxford), ‘“Call it not Poetry, Call it Rhyming”: Reconsidering eighteenth-century women’s occasional poetry’

 

12.45-1.30: LUNCH

 

1.30-3.00: PANEL 7

Cultures of Consumption

Chair: Adam Rounce

Julian Ferraro (University of Liverpool), ‘Satire, laughter, and appetite in the poetry of Pope and Swift’

Andrew Kahn (University of Oxford), ‘Poetry and the discovery of literary pleasure in eighteenth-century Russia’

Andrew Lincoln (Queen Mary, University of London), ‘Imperial landscape: A poet on Gibraltar’

 

3.15-4.45: PANEL 8

Disseminating Knowledge

Chair: Octavia Cox

Marianne Brooker (Birkbeck, University of London), ‘“[T]he sensation, without the sense, of connection”: Methodizing the compendium’

Corrina Readioff (University of Liverpool), ‘A poetic battle: epigraphic rivalry in The Tatler and The Female Tatler

Madelaine Schurch (University of York), ‘“The world’s something bigger”: Anna Barbauld and the poetics of astronomy’

 

5.00-5.30: PRESENTATION

The Launch of the Redeveloped Digital Miscellanies Index

 

5.30-6.30: KEYNOTE DISCUSSION

Digital Humanities and Eighteenth-Century Poetry

Jennifer Batt (University of Bristol) and Adam Rounce (University of Nottingham)

Registration and Programme

We’re very pleased to announce that registration is now open for Lines of Connection!

The registration fee is £20, or £15 for students / unwaged; lunch and refreshments will be provided on both days of the conference.  Find out more and register on our secure booking site.

We’re very much looking forward to welcoming an exciting line-up of speakers to Oxford in the summer.  Below are full details of the draft programme.

 

7 July 2016

9.15: WELCOME

 

9.30-11.00: PANEL 1

Verse Miscellanies and Authorship

John T. Gilmore (University of Warwick), ‘Authorship and anonymity in eighteenth-century British Latin verse’

Kathleen Lawton-Trask (University of Oxford), ‘Mary Leapor, Alexander Pope, and the Dryden-Tonson miscellanies’

Carly Watson (University of Oxford), ‘How many authors make a miscellany? Authorship in printed verse miscellanies of the eighteenth century’

 

11.15 -12.45: PANEL 2

Science and Religion in Eighteenth-Century Poetry

Ari Messer (Birkbeck, University of London), ‘Vitalism, death and display in Christopher Smart’s Psalms

James Morland (King’s College London), ‘Connections with ancient atheism: Lucretius as an adaptive eighteenth-century poetic influence’

Andrea Penso (Stendhal-Grenoble 3 University), ‘The connection between poetry and philosophy in Italy during the second half of the eighteenth century’

 

12.45-1.30: LUNCH

 

1.30-3.00: PANEL 3

Poetry, Music, and Sound

Christopher Chan (University of Pennsylvania), ‘“Harmoniously confus’d”: Visual fantasies and audible anxieties in Alexander Pope’s Windsor-Forest

Joan Passey (University of Bristol), ‘“The Shakespeare of prose”: Ann Radcliffe and the sonics of sonnets’

Martin Wåhlberg (Norwegian University of Science and Technology), ‘Poetry and music: the song connection’

 

3.15-4.45: PANEL 4

Approaches to André Chénier

Maria Klimova (Radboud University Nijmegen), ‘Translating Hellenism: The poetic techniques of André Chénier’

David McCallam (University of Sheffield), ‘The Orpheus effect: André Chénier and “embodied” poetry’

Susan Reynolds (British Library), ‘“We are all the contrary: The changing image of Greece in eighteenth-century European poetry’

 

5.00-6.30: KEYNOTE LECTURE

Catriona Seth (University of Oxford), ‘Melancholy marks: Gray’s Elegy and French verse’

 

6.30: DRINKS RECEPTION

 

7.30: CONFERENCE DINNER

 

8 July 2016

9.30-11.00: PANEL 5

Poetry and the Epistolary

Nicholas Cronk (University of Oxford), ‘“Family verses” in Voltaire’s correspondence’

Tobias Heinrich (University of Oxford), ‘Loquacious shepherds: Poetic dialogue in German Anacreontics’

Kelsey Rubin-Detlev (University of Oxford), ‘Poetry and friendship in the letters of N. M. Karamzin to I. I. Dmitriev’

 

11.15-12.45: PANEL 6

Poetry and Sociability

Mary Chadwick (University of Huddersfield), ‘Antigua, Boston, Denbigh: miscellaneous manuscript poetry and idealised femininity in the eighteenth century’

Stephanie Clayton (Cardiff University), ‘“Consign[ing] Eusebia to celestial Fame”: Integrating patronage and authorship in the poetry of Frances Thynne Seymour, the Countess of Hertford’

Kathleen Keown (University of Oxford), ‘“Call it not Poetry, Call it Rhyming”: Reconsidering eighteenth-century women’s occasional poetry’

 

12.45-1.30: LUNCH

 

1.30-3.00: PANEL 7

Cultures of Consumption

Julian Ferraro (University of Liverpool), ‘Satire, laughter, and appetite in the poetry of Pope and Swift’

Andrew Kahn (University of Oxford), ‘All that glitters is not gold: poetry and value in the Russian eighteenth century’

Andrew Lincoln (Queen Mary, University of London), ‘Imperial landscape: A poet on Gibraltar’

 

3.15-4.45: PANEL 8

Disseminating Knowledge

Marianne Brooker (Birkbeck, University of London), ‘“[T]he sensation, without the sense, of connection”: Methodizing the compendium’

Corrina Readioff (University of Liverpool), ‘A poetic battle: epigraphic rivalry in The Tatler and The Female Tatler

Madelaine Schurch (University of York), ‘“The world’s something bigger”: Anna Barbauld and the poetics of astronomy’

 

5.00-5.30: PRESENTATION

The Launch of the Redeveloped Digital Miscellanies Index

 

5.30-6.30: KEYNOTE DISCUSSION

Digital Humanities and Eighteenth-Century Poetry

Jennifer Batt (University of Bristol) and Adam Rounce (University of Nottingham)

 

Call for Papers now closed

Thank you to everyone who has sent in a proposal for Lines of Connection!

We’re delighted to have received so many interesting abstracts from so many different parts of the world – the eighteenth century continues to inspire international co-operation and exchange.

Now begins the exciting process of putting together the conference programme.  Once the speakers have been contacted, the programme will be posted here.  Follow us or check back for updates!

Call for Papers

We are delighted to announce an international conference on eighteenth-century poetry to be held in Oxford on 7th and 8th July 2016.

Lines of Connection is organised by the Digital Miscellanies project in association with the TORCH Enlightenment Programme / Besterman Centre for the Enlightenment.

The keynote lecture will be given by Professor Catriona Seth (University of Oxford).

For more information about the conference, please see Conference details.

We are inviting proposals for 20-minute papers exploring new ways of looking at poetry from the period 1700 to 1800. While papers will be in English, we encourage proposals from researchers working on eighteenth-century poetry in any language, and in any discipline. We welcome proposals from postgraduate and early career researchers as well as established scholars. Papers on the theme of connection – between national poetic cultures, or between poetry from the eighteenth century and other periods, for example – will be especially welcome. But we encourage submissions on any topic, which may include the following:

  • poetic forms and genres,
  • poetry in translation,
  • imitation, allusion and influence,
  • the publication and circulation of poetry in print and manuscript,
  • poetry and material culture,
  • authorship and anonymity,
  • canon formation and re-formation,
  • high culture and popular culture,
  • poetry in performance,
  • poetry in drama, opera or music,
  • eighteenth-century poetry and the digital humanities,
  • periodization and the eighteenth century.

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to Carly Watson (carly.watson@ell.ox.ac.uk) and Kelsey Rubin-Detlev (kelsey.rubin-detlev@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk) by 15th January 2016.

We expect to be able to offer a number of modest bursaries for speakers who are students or unwaged, to contribute towards the costs of travel and accommodation. If you wish to be considered for a bursary, please mention this when you submit your abstract, or feel free to get in touch beforehand.

This blog will be periodically updated with conference announcements and useful information. To keep up to date with new posts, see the options below.